Nueva Publicación de nuestro investigador Gabriel Carrasco

Revista: Parasites and Vectors SJR:1.09  Q:1

Año: 2022

The use of drones for mosquito surveillance and control

Gabriel Carrasco-Escobar 1 2Marta Moreno 3Kimberly Fornace 3 4 5Manuela Herrera-Varela 6Edgar Manrique 7Jan E Conn 8 9

Affiliations

  1. Health Innovation Laboratory, Institute of Tropical Medicine "Alexander Von Humboldt", Universidad Peruana Cayetano Heredia, Lima, Peru. Esta dirección de correo electrónico está siendo protegida contra los robots de spam. Necesita tener JavaScript habilitado para poder verlo..
  2. School of Public Health, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, USA. Esta dirección de correo electrónico está siendo protegida contra los robots de spam. Necesita tener JavaScript habilitado para poder verlo..
  3. Faculty of Infectious and Tropical Diseases and Centre for Climate Change and Planetary Health, London School Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, London, UK.
  4. School of Biodiversity, One Health and Veterinary Medicine, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, UK.
  5. Saw Swee Hock School of Public Health, National University of Singapore and National University Health System, Singapore, Singapore.
  6. Grupo de Investigación en Entomología, Facultad de Medicina, Universidad Nacional de Colombia, Bogotá, Colombia.
  7. Health Innovation Laboratory, Institute of Tropical Medicine "Alexander Von Humboldt", Universidad Peruana Cayetano Heredia, Lima, Peru.
  8. The Wadsworth Center, New York State Department of Health, Albany, NY, USA.
  9. Department of Biomedical Sciences, School of Public Health, State University of New York, Albany, NY, USA.

PMID: 36527116   PMCID: PMC9758801   DOI: 10.1186/s13071-022-05580-5

Abstract

In recent years, global health security has been threatened by the geographical expansion of vector-borne infectious diseases such as malaria, dengue, yellow fever, Zika and chikungunya. For a range of these vector-borne diseases, an increase in residual (exophagic) transmission together with ecological heterogeneity in everything from weather to local human migration and housing to mosquito species' behaviours presents many challenges to effective mosquito control. The novel use of drones (or uncrewed aerial vehicles) may play a major role in the success of mosquito surveillance and control programmes in the coming decades since the global landscape of mosquito-borne diseases and disease dynamics fluctuates frequently and there could be serious public health consequences if the issues of insecticide resistance and outdoor transmission are not adequately addressed. For controlling both aquatic and adult stages, for several years now remote sensing data have been used together with predictive modelling for risk, incidence and detection of transmission hot spots and landscape profiles in relation to mosquito-borne pathogens. The field of drone-based remote sensing is under continuous change due to new technology development, operation regulations and innovative applications. In this review we outline the opportunities and challenges for integrating drones into vector surveillance (i.e. identification of breeding sites or mapping micro-environmental composition) and control strategies (i.e. applying larval source management activities or deploying genetically modified agents) across the mosquito life-cycle. We present a five-step systematic environmental mapping strategy that we recommend be undertaken in locations where a drone is expected to be used, outline the key considerations for incorporating drone or other Earth Observation data into vector surveillance and provide two case studies of the advantages of using drones equipped with multispectral cameras. In conclusion, recent developments mean that drones can be effective for accurately conducting surveillance, assessing habitat suitability for larval and/or adult mosquitoes and implementing interventions. In addition, we briefly discuss the need to consider permissions, costs, safety/privacy perceptions and community acceptance for deploying drone activities.

Keywords: Control; Dengue; Drones; Infectious diseases; Malaria; Uncrewed aerial vehicle.

figure 2

Fig. 2 To successfully map the environment where mosquitoes develop it is important to do it in a systematic way, to guarantee repetition on subsequent sampling campaigns and to achieve the proposed goals of the survey. Steps 1–5 show an example of the workflow that is used to map the aquatic habitats of anopheline mosquitoes. AOI, Area of interest; GCP, Ground Control Points; GPS, Global Positioning System

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